Teams Getting More Exposure on Social Media Than TV

Sourced from CNBC
Carolin Roth, Lucy Handley, special to CNBC | Wednesday, 22 Mar 2017

March Madness – the main season for U.S. college basketball – generated $1.24 billion of TV ad dollars in 2016 according to Kantar Media, making it the second most valuable post-season sports tournament in the U.S.

And while advertisers in the sports arena always want to go where the eyeballs are, they may want to shift their attention to social media, which has the potential for greater reach than TV, according to one expert.

Ophir Tanz, the chief executive of Gum Gum, a technology company that analyzes the images posted on social media and correlates them with brands, claims that the potential of social platforms in sport has been hugely undervalued. Gum Gum works with some of the teams in the NBA basketball league – which itself generated more than $1 billion in TV advertising in 2016 according to Kantar Media – to understand the impact of social media posts and put a monetary value on them.

“What we found is really quite striking. If you are a rights holder or team, we have been able to show that in most cases the exposure that’s being obtained on social is nearly equivalent and sometimes more than television,” he said during a panel led by CNBC anchor Carolin Roth at Advertising Week Europe in London this week.”

“TV is definitely not dead. I’d say there is still in many ways more sponsorship value to be extracted from that medium, ” he added.”

“At the same time, there has been a dramatic undervaluation of the exposure that social is providing – effectively if you can’t track it and prove it then it doesn’t really exist.”

For Nick Pinder, head of partnership marketing EMEA at the U.K.’s Manchester City Football Club, being able to quantify the value of social media is relatively new.

“We work with analytics companies to be able to quantify and to be able to put an accurate measurement on the growing social phenomena which hasn’t been the case in recent years. The strides we have been able to make have been significant, moving away from that typical model where it is driven by broadcast and driven by those numbers,” he said during the panel.

Manchester City’s streamed its women’s team’s first UEFA Women’s Champions League game on Facebook Live, in partnership with car manufacturer Nissan last October. Pinder said the engagement from fans was “extremely impressive.” Player Yaya Toure also used Snapchat spectacles to show people behind the scenes at City’s Etihad stadium in January 2017.

The value of a sports team or brand is something rights-holders work hard to quantify. Tim Ellerton, commercial director of Team GB, the U.K.’s Olympic team, is currently looking at this. “We’ve just put out a piece of work to really get to the crux of what the values of our own channels are and what that could mean to current and hopefully potential sponsors as well,” he said during the panel.”

“It will allow us to have a very sensible conversation with a partner when we put a number down on the table about what we believe our rights are worth, and hopefully we can verify it. It also allows that conversation when they go back to their CEO or CMO [chief marketing officer] to get sign off, do they actually understand what joining up with a brand like Team GB will actually mean for the short, mid and long term.”

Pavement lights guide ‘smartphone zombies’

Sourced from BBC.com

Pavement lights have been installed at a pedestrian crossing in a Netherlands town to help smartphone users cross the road safely.

The light strips are designed to catch the eye of people looking down at their device, and change colour to match traffic signals.

The lure of games and social media has come “at the expense of attention to traffic”, said councillor Kees Oskam. But Dutch road safety group VVN said the idea “rewards bad behaviour”.

Feet on a streetImage copyright FLORIS VEELENTURF
Image caption – The lights change colour to match pedestrian signals

“It’s not a good idea to help mobile phone users look at their phones,” said Jose de Jong of VVN, the Dutch Traffic Safety Association.

“We don’t want people to use phones when they’re dealing with traffic, even when walking around. People must always look around them, to check if cars are actually stopping at the red signals.”

The lights have been installed on a trial basis at one crossing, close to three schools in Bodegraven. The company that developed the technology says it hopes to offer the strips to other towns in the future.

Similar pavement lights are being tested in the German city of Augsburg to help so-called “smartphone zombies” navigate level crossings.

How to avoid dangerous websites

Use the built-in search engine filters

Many modern search engines provide a way to do a ‘safer’ search when using their search engine.  As an example, Google allows users to toggle on or off a ‘safe search filtering’ option at the Advanced Search page.

Not only do these built-in filters work well, but they are free!

Use an Internet security filter

If you want use something that is always active and watching over your (or your family members’) entire time browsing the web, there are many internet filters that you can purchase and download online.  These ‘always on’ filters work by providing warnings when a user attempts to access a site which has been deemed questionable by the filtering software.  This type of filter is great way for parents to help keep their web browsing children safe online.

Don’t guess a website’s address

This is probably the number one way people accidentally find themselves at a questionable, or even dangerous, website.  For example, have you ever guessed the White House’s website at whitehouse.com (DON’T!)?  It does not take you to the website of the United States President’s residence.  Many clever malicious people purposely purchase URL’s that are extremely similar to legitimate website URL’s in hopes of getting unsuspecting prey to their malware-ridden websites.   If you are not 100% sure of the URL for a site you wish to visit then do not type it in.  Instead, type your guessed URL into a search engine like google.com, using the safe search option if you want to be extra careful.  You can then click to the legitimate site from the search results.

Never click on sites that seem questionable

This one is pretty simple.  If something doesn’t look or ‘feel’ right about a website or link then just don’t go there or click the link.  Again, this is a great time to use a search engine to verify the website or link.

Make Web safety a priority

If you aren’t paying attention to what you are doing online, it only takes a few seconds to accidentally end up somewhere you really don’t want to, or worse – infected.  Simply staying alert and paying attention to what links you are clicking online is one of the easiest, most effective ways to say online.

Contact NCGIT today to learn about the business-class solutions we offer to keep your employees and business safe online!

Client Spotlight: CAP Systems

A modern, cloud based solution for both its internal needs and, most importantly, for providing its hosted solution in a highly secure, highly available, and scalable way to Community Action, Human Service and Head Start Agencies across the US – This is the challenge CAP Systems engaged NCGIT to solve.  The primary goal for CAP was transitioning its old solution from one that ran at client sites and on client provided servers, to a new, fully cloud hosted solution.  At the same time, they wanted to remove the need for an in-house IT infrastructure and provide improved accessibility for its increasingly distributed workforce.

NCGIT worked with CAP Systems to design and implement a solution for each of their requirements.  For email, file sharing, and collaboration, we migrated them to Microsoft’s hosted Office 365 solution.  Phones were also of critical importance for CAP so we helped them implement RingCentral’s hosted PBX solution which allows their distributed workforce to communicate with each other and with clients via desk phone, mobile phone app, or computer soft phone anywhere in the world as if they were all in the same office.  The final and most important piece of the project was implementing the new cloud infrastructure for their new hosted Enterprise Client Data Management Software solution.  This is being done using Microsoft’s Azure Infrastructure as a Service offering.  CAP is now able to rapidly add or remove servers and resources as needed in a highly secure, highly available environment to its customers.

Contact NCGIT today to learn about how we can help your business achieve its goals!

———–

About CAP Systems

CAP Systems, Inc. has been providing software for Community Action, Human Service, and Head Start Agencies for more than 40 years.  Originally in the consulting and custom systems development business, PMI/CAPS developed systems for many Fortune 500 companies and United Nations Agencies. We are dedicated to a continuing investment in new technology and a commitment to providing our customers with the most powerful tools available.

Our original Financial System, designed in 1972 for Community Action Agencies, was the first fund accounting system in the nation.  The system has expanded over the years to include modules that address every aspect of the fiscal and administrative functions of Community Action.  Today CAPS is involved in the development of software for:
·       Head Start
·       Child Care
·       Energy Assistance
·       Weatherization
·       Information and Referral
·       Individual and Family Needs Assessment
·       Outcomes and Results Measurement
·       Case Management
·       Benefits Administration
·       Client Tracking, CSBG Reporting
·       Analysis of Client Characteristics
·       Health and many more activities typically associated with Community Action

www.capsystems.com

How to Identify a Phishing Email

Q.  I’ve received emails from my bank that I suspect are fraudulent, but I’m nervous about ignoring them. What should I do?

A.  First, check the sender’s email address for misspellings. Fraudsters trying to lure you with a phishing scam might use an address that’s similar to a company’s official one, but not exactly the same. It’s not a foolproof tactic, though, because some crooks can completely “spoof” an email address. But you can be certain that a U.S.-based organization’s email address won’t include a domain extension from a different country (such as .ru for Russia or .br for Brazil). Many phishing attempts originate abroad, often from non-native English speakers, so poor spelling and awkward sentence structure in the body of the email could be another telltale clue.

Hovering your cursor over links in the email’s text will reveal a code showing where the link really leads. If it doesn’t include the company’s domain name before the first forward slash (/), don’t click on it. And last, if the email asks you to verify or provide personal information such as credit card and bank account numbers, your Social Security number, or passwords, it’s definitely a fraud, says the Federal Trade Commission. If you’re still in any doubt about whether the email is legit, reach your bank directly; check the contacts page on its website.

In the mood for a deeper dive?

Every day countless phishing emails are sent to unsuspecting victims all over the world. While some of these messages are so outlandish that they are obvious frauds, others can be a bit more convincing. So how do you tell the difference between a phishing message and a legitimate message? Unfortunately, there is no one single technique that works in every situation, but there are a number of things that you can look for. Here are the top 10 things to look for.

1 – The message contains poor spelling and grammar

As mentioned above, whenever a large company sends out a message on behalf of the company as a whole, the message is usually reviewed for spelling, grammar, and legality, among other things. So if a message is filled with poor grammar or spelling mistakes, it probably didn’t come from a major corporation’s legal department.

2 – URLs contain a misleading domain name

Phishing scams often depend on their victims not knowing how the DNS naming structure for domains works. The last part of a domain name is the most telling. For example, the domain name info.ncgit.com would be a child domain of ncgit.com because ncgit.com appears at the end of the full domain name (on the right-hand side). Conversely, ncgit.com.maliciousdomain.com would clearly not have originated from nccgit.com because the reference to ncgit.com is on the left side of the domain name.

This trick is used countless times by phishing artists as a way of trying to convince victims that a message came from a company like Microsoft or Apple. The phishing artist simply creates a child domain bearing the name Microsoft, Apple, or whatever. The resulting domain name looks something like this: Apple.maliciousdomainname.com.

3 – The message contains a mismatched URL

A clue that an email is suspicious is the integrity of any embedded URLs. Oftentimes the URL in a phishing message will appear to be perfectly valid. However, if you hover your mouse over the top of the URL, you should see the actual hyperlinked address (at least in Outlook). If the hyperlinked address is different from the address that is displayed, the message is probably fraudulent or malicious.

4 – The message asks for personal information

No matter how official an email message might look, it’s always a bad sign if the message asks for personal information. Your bank doesn’t need you to send it your account number. It already knows what that is. Similarly, a reputable company should never send an email asking for your password, credit card number, or the answer to a security question.

5 – The offer seems too good to be true

There is an old saying that if something seems too good to be true, it probably is. That holds especially true for email messages. If you receive a message from someone unknown to you who is making big promises, the message is probably a scam.

6: You didn’t initiate the action

Have you ever received an email letting you know you’ve won a raffle for a cruise?! The only problem is that you never bought a raffle ticket. If you get a message informing you that you have won a contest you did not enter, you can bet that the message is a scam.

7 – You’re asked to send money to cover expenses

One telltale sign of a phishing email is that you will eventually be asked for money. You might not get hit up for cash in the initial message. But sooner or later, phishing artists will likely ask for money to cover expenses, taxes, fees, or something similar. If that happens, you can bet that it’s a scam.

8 – The message makes unrealistic threats

Although most of the phishing scams try to trick people into giving up cash or sensitive information by promising instant riches, some phishing artists use intimidation to scare victims into giving up information. If a message makes unrealistic threats, it’s probably a scam.

9 – The message appears to be from a government agency

Phishing artists who want to use intimidation will often pose as a bank or send messages claiming to have come from a law enforcement agency, the IRS, the FBI, or just about any other entity that might scare the average law-abiding citizen. I can’t tell you how government agencies work outside the United States. But here, government agencies don’t normally use email as an initial point of contact. That isn’t to say that law enforcement and other government agencies don’t use email. However, law enforcement agencies follow certain protocols. They don’t typically engage in email-based extortion.

10 – Something just doesn’t look right

Trust your gut and use your JDLR senses —just doesn’t look right. If something looks off, there’s probably a good reason why. This same principle almost always applies to email messages. If you receive a message that seems suspicious, it’s usually in your best interest to avoid acting on the message.

Mitigate phishing scams with help from NCGIT

Phishing scams and spear-phishing threats are on the rise, causing disruption and damage to enterprises everywhere. Designed to fool your employees into reviewing credentials, passwords and other confidential information, phishing scams are involved in more than 90 percent of hacking attacks today1.

The impact of phishing scams on profitability and productivity is huge. Breaches can cost millions, destroying corporate reputations and significantly degrading customer loyalty. Protecting your organization from phishing threats is critical — and that’s where Mimecast can help.

NCGIT’s secure email solutions offer comprehensive defense against phishing scams and other advanced threats, as well as data leaks and routine threats like spam, malware and viruses. Offering always-on, always up-to-date protection that eliminates the cost and complexity of traditional offerings, NCGIT’s email security solutions provide enterprise-grade protection so you and your organization breathe easier.

Contact us today to learn our secure email solutions

Moneyball II: Using analytics to understand Red Sox fans

Sourced from straighttalk.hcltech.com

By Brian Shield, Chief Information Officer, Boston Red Sox
bobmwallace@comcast.net

By Brian Shield, Chief Information Officer, Boston Red Sox

Talk about perfect timing. I joined the Red Sox in August 2013, just as the team’s 10-year, 820-game sell-out streak had come to an end, following the team’s unceremonious fall from grace late in the 2012 season. For the Red Sox, who had been regular pennant contenders and had won two World Series in the previous decade, 2012 was their first losing season since 1997 and their worst season since 1965. The executive management of the team—which was founded in 1901 and has played at America’s oldest baseball park since 1912—had decided that it was time for a digital transformation.

I came to the Red Sox from The Weather Channel, where I was CIO for almost 15 years. To the average person, the only similarity between baseball and weather might be their unpredictability. To my surprise, however, I found many things in common between the Red Sox and my former company. Both organizations are iconic consumer brands with well-known stars. They have loyal and often zealous followers, have limited “traditional” competition in their respective markets, and have understandably invested heavily in the consumer-facing side of the business.

In both instances, however, success had led to some technical complacency, with under-investment in the engine that fuels all businesses today—data—becoming a handicap in the face of changing market dynamics.  At The Weather Channel, I ultimately was responsible for one of the world’s largest cross-platform digital properties, big “weather” data environments, and fully distributed cable networks.  But that only happened as rapid advances in the breadth and quality of weather data, imagery, and availability hastened the need for changes in digital weather products – a digital impetus that baseball had lacked.

As businesses in many industries around the world are learning, the promise of their digital transformation efforts lies in collecting and analyzing data on customers’ behavior in order to provide them with products and services tailored to their individual needs. Digital transformation also has a profound impact on internal operations, and it allows for quick experimentation and evaluation of new business processes.  The challenge, however, is not to get carried away with digitization of everything and to maintain traditions and “analog” ways of doing things that still provide value to 21st-century customers.  At the Red Sox, that means preserving what’s best in baseball and historic Fenway Park while leveraging what’s best in technology.

A 360-Degree View of the Customer

While the movie Moneyball, based on Michael Lewis’s 2003 book Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game, brought the use of data analytics (or in baseball parlance, “sabermetrics”) to the informed baseball fan, the analysis primarily focused on evaluating talent.  The book recounts how the Oakland Athletics successfully substituted player assessments based on traditional baseball metrics (for example, batting average, runs batted in, or a pitcher’s wins and losses, not to mention subjective “gut feelings”),  with “newer” metrics that improve predictive analytics. This allowed the A’s to build a winning team on a relatively low budget, and the story has become a famous foundational tale of the “big data” movement. But as yet there has been no Moneyball-like customer-analysis story, to demonstrate the successful application of analytics to better serve baseball fans.

In the sports world, baseball is not unique in its limited knowledge of its customer base.  According to one recent estimate, U.S. sports teams, on average, know less than 5% of their fans. For the Red Sox, this would imply having limited knowledge of about 400k fans out of the 7 million-plus adults in New England who consider themselves citizens of “Red Sox Nation.”

While traditional market segmentation efforts – the young fan who attends games frequently, the small business owner who entertains clients at games, etc. – provide a helpful window onto the sporting-fan population, such basic scrutiny won’t get you to first base in today’s digital age.  Today, we must understand and serve fans’ individual needs.  For that, we must have a 360-degree knowledge of each customer.

Basically, sports franchises have had two key obstacles to more fully understanding the fan. One was that teams are historically one step removed from the buyer, who may have purchased a ticket or merchandise from any one of a variety of channels and middlemen. The other was that the data we collected was coming from disparate data sources and housed in disparate databases.  The result was that you know that X has been a season ticket holder for Y years, but you probably don’t know how old he (or she) is; his family status; how many games he, as holder of the season tickets, personally attends; his concession habits; etc.  In short, sports franchises knew how many people purchased tickets and where they sat, but little else about them.

The realization that past data practices are woefully inadequate in today’s digital world is certainly not limited to sports.  Even many of the companies that today are considered “big data” powerhouses were anything but that just a few short years ago.  For example, as the 21stcentury rolled around, only limited historical weather data was captured at The Weather Channel.  Why capture information on the storm that just passed? Or so the reasoning went. As digital platforms and learning systems evolved, however, so did the need for more granular and more diverse data.

For the Red Sox to match its player analytics with data-driven, fan-level analytics required a comprehensive approach. We needed to create new capabilities in the IT function; transform our data collection and integration practices to emphasize the importance of data analytics and reporting; and offer new digitally enabled fan-facing programs.

New Skills and a New Organization

The first step in transforming our knowledge of our customers was to create a data-services team.  The sole focus of this small group is data, more specifically, data on our customers. To staff it, we hired people with skills and expertise that we hadn’t had, including a data architect, a sports-oriented CRM analyst, and business analytics and reporting specialists.

In addition to creating the data-services group, we had to evolve our IT organization.  Like any championship-caliber team, we needed to adapt to changes in expectations, team chemistry, and our portfolio of skills.  To accomplish this, we took a page from how successful baseball teams are built.  We designed our team by emphasizing strong leadership and coaching, comprised of a few all-stars, free agents in the form of consultants, utility players with key differentiated skills, new experienced players from outside of our club, and a young and hungry farm system comprising part-time resources and select interns.

It’s worth noting that because in today’s digital age IT teams need to be lean, adaptable, and skilled in using leading-edge solutions, sports organizations increasingly look to outside industries for their technology professionals, rather than relying on the traditional internal farm system. The Oakland Athletics’ Billy Beane, the central character of Moneyball, was absolutely right when he told the Wall Street Journal a couple years ago: “Increased demand for technical skills required to interpret the ‘big data’ will dramatically change the composition and demographics of front offices… [S]port will no longer be the exclusive domain of ‘insiders,’ and the business will be better for it.” In other words, insularity is your worst enemy in a fast-changing digital world.

Accordingly, at the Red Sox we rounded out our “virtual” team by cultivating key relationships with local colleges and universities to provide critical external insight, and we engaged with a few key strategic partners to effectively balance the buy-versus-build equation.

A Focus on Data Collection and Analysis

In parallel with our people changes, we significantly upgraded the infrastructure supporting the collection and analysis of our data.  The nucleus of this infrastructure investment was a state-of the-art enterprise data warehouse, complemented by custom-designed CRM applications, leading-edge reporting tools, and the integration of the data warehouse with a sophisticated, third-party fan-engagement platform.

When you start focusing on the data, a very important aspect of digital transformation becomes clear to everybody in the organization: quality beats quantity every time. Until you can effectively harness the data, analytics is just a dream.  In our case, there are more than ten different ways for someone to buy a ticket to attend a Red Sox game.  This means we have ten ways by which an error can occur.  Add to that the duplication of customer data, and you have the makings of a serious data-quality problem.

We have made progress in our data governance and quality management efforts, but it’s a journey that is never complete.   What’s critical is that we have a commitment to data integrity and a process to identify and address data inaccuracies at both the beginning and end of each data ingest and integration process.

Enhancing the Fan Experience

Digital transformation also means adding a digital layer on top of the physical reality of your enterprise. For us – and most importantly, for our fans—the physical reality is America’s oldest and most loved ballpark, Fenway Park. We started there with the basics—collaborating with the Major League Baseball organization (MLB) to install a Wi-Fi network throughout the park. By the mid-season All-Star break of 2015, working through the snowiest winter in Boston’s history, we finally completed the installation.

Connectivity is like oxygen in today’s digital age.  Customers everywhere expect connectivity to be ubiquitous, in high concentrations, and readily available.  Connectivity, however, is but a means to an end. It’s what you do with it that determines user satisfaction. We are still early in our digital journey when it comes to creating compelling digital products and services that will both simplify and enhance the fan experience.

We are leveraging the capabilities of the MLB Ballpark mobile application, which supports digital ticketing, in-game seat upgrades, offers and promotions, and loyalty rewards programs.  We have created a virtual-reality site called Kid Concourse, where young fans can visit Fenway online – including the VR Dugout. We’re currently considering other fan enhancements that leverage such technologies as RFID (for example, team jerseys embedded with an RFID chip that would allow fans wearing them to receive discounts on concessions and merchandise), augmented reality (to provide historical information for landmarks around Fenway Park), and wayfinding kiosks (to help fans find their seats and learn about concession options), among others.

These are all examples of how digital technology operates on two levels – in the present and in the future. It provides more convenience and extra services to customers, increasing their satisfaction, their loyalty, and what they spend on your services. But it also facilitates a long-term perspective that provides you with more information on customers’ behavior so you can serve them better in the future.

Digital applications not only add a whole new dimension to fans’ experience in the specific physical environment of the baseball park; apps can also extend that experience to include fans (and potential fans) at home or on the move.  For example, we have a very successful tour program at Fenway Park. Should we start offering a virtual-reality tour for anyone with an Internet connection or appropriate headsets?

The opportunities that digital transformation brings are just about limitless and there are probably quite a few we haven’t thought about.  (If you have suggestions, let us know at DigitalIdeas@RedSox.com).

But so far, we have made a great deal of progress in our journey to build a 360-degree view of our fans. This is the exciting nature of digital transformation. It’s a never-ending quest, always providing new opportunities to take your game—together with employees, partners, and customers—to the next level.  As our digital strategy evolves, our understanding of Red Sox Nation – who we believe are the best fans in major league baseball – will continue to evolve.  We expect this understanding to help fuel a new generation of digital fan amenities that will complement the wonderful game of baseball and the charm of Fenway Park.

Client Spotlight: LCB Senior Living

Scalable, repeatable, highly available, and centrally managed – Those are the characteristics of the IT infrastructure LCB Senior Living asked NCGIT to provide for its planned roll-out of senior housing communities throughout the eastern US.  At the time, LCB had a small management office and only a handful of residences it was managing.  An old school approach of managing each location individually with in-house servers was sufficient and manageable.  However, with the plan to begin building and managing new residences all over New England and the eastern US, it was clear that this old approach was not going to be a viable approach for providing the scalability, repeat-ability and central management LCB desired.

LCB now has successfully expanded its footprint to 22 senior residences from VT to CT and in 2017 is planning to open 4 more new residences in MA and NH.  To facilitate this aggressive growth from an IT perspective NCGIT designed and implemented a fully cloud hosted infrastructure shared across all facilities.  The solution combines cloud hosted desktops, servers, file sharing, email, website security filtering, and cloud based Wifi and firewall management.  This allows all users across all of the locations to access their same desktops, files, and emails from any location, and to do it reliably and securely.  Equally importantly, this cloud hosted infrastructure allows LCB to scale its infrastructure quickly and in a highly repeatable fashion.  NCGIT and LCB internal IT resources are also able to quickly, easily and centrally manage all aspects of the IT infrastructure.

Contact us today to see how NCGIT can help your business implement a secure, robust, and highly reliable cloud based IT infrastructure!

About LCB Senior Living, LLC

LCB Senior Living, LLC is a developer/operator and third-party manager of quality senior housing communities.  Since 1994, the LCB team has been pioneers in modern senior living, providing Independent Living, Assisted living and Memory Care services throughout New England and the eastern United States.  During that time, they built and sold the 16th-largest such company in the nation, and are currently one of the fastest-growing senior housing companies in the region.

Whether it be developing and managing beautiful new residences, or managing yours, LCB prides itself in creating communities where residents can enjoy continued comfort, security and dignity as their individual physical and cognitive needs change.

www.lcbseniorliving.com

Client Spotlight: Hacin & Associates

Strategic, responsive IT management – That is what NCGIT has been providing Hacin & Associates since 2013 through a strategic IT partnership. At the time, the incumbent IT provider was delivering only break/fix support, spotty proactive network management, and no strategic IT consulting.  Since assuming the role of virtual CIO and network infrastructure manager for Hacin, NCGIT has dramatically changed that situation by providing highly proactive IT infrastructure management and aligned IT solutions and budgets with business goals and strategies. Over the course of the past several years, NCGIT has also helped Hacin & Associates phase in a modernized IT infrastructure. An aging phone system was replaced with a VoIP solution providing highly increased functionality, resiliency, and mobility. The old backup system was replaced with a cloud-based solution providing highly secure, efficient, and robust disaster recovery and business continuity capabilities.  The server infrastructure has been stabilized and a more effective and secure remote access solution has been implemented.  Along with the strategic consulting and infrastructure improvements, NCGIT has provided Hacin with day-to-day proactive infrastructure management and proactive troubleshooting and has very effectively coordinated the IT infrastructure move to a new office space.  Hacin & Associates no longer has to spend time, staff, or inefficient and ineffective budget worrying about current and potential IT problems, and can instead focus on providing world class architecture solutions knowing that instead of being a constant and expensive speed bump in their path, their IT infrastructure is now an effective tool helping them achieve their business goals.

Check out Hacin & Associates now.

www.hacin.com

Improve IT Security

We live in a world where data breaches and hacks are almost a daily news headline, so IT security is vital. The majority of businesses handle customer information, meaning that one weak password could be the ticket for it all to be exposed and in the wrong hands. Ultimately, this type of breach makes trust with your customers virtually non-existent.

Here are few tips to compliment your company toolbox to enhance your business security.

#1 A STRONG PASSWORD

The reality of using short memorable dictionary words is no longer an option if you want security. Want business security? Stop using dictionary words they are ridiculously easy to crack.  Brute-force attacks are becoming more successful as time goes on.

Start by using a password generator:  https://www.dashlane.com/password-generator/ By default, it gives you a 15-character phrase that looks nothing like plain English.

#2 SHAKE IT UP

If the thought of having a different password for each service makes you feel overwhelmed, manage them with an application. There are a number of reputable password managers out there. Here are just a few:  DashLane (free/premium option) or LastPass (free/premium option). It’s also wise to regularly change your passwords; once a month is a decent interval. The 20 minutes you’ll spend updating your credentials for all the services you use will more than pay for themselves.

Make a 20-minute date with yourself, put it on your calendar to update your passwords monthly. Taking this time to update your passwords regularly is an excellent ROI.

#3 THE TWO-FACTOR AUTHENTICATION ROUTE

You know you have done it, skipped over this added measure when setting up your e-mail account or bank account, we have all done it.  DON’T! This security measure puts an extra step in place and is an efficient way to rebuff remote access. WHY DO I NEED THIS? You have your number on file with your bank account and they will send you a verification code via text when a hacker attempts to log into your account from a different IP address.  If you are vacationing and it was you, then you can enter the code and all is well. For a hacker to access this account, they would have to have access to your phone.

Now is the critical time to find an IT partner that will protect all of your devices.

At NCGIT, we are focused on building strategic partnerships with each client while addressing their IT needs. If you’d like to learn more about what NCGIT can do for you, please contact us at (781)297-7590 or info@ncgit.com.